Saudi Arabia closes Cairo embassy, recalls ambassador due to protests over detained Egyptian

Washington Post:

(Ahmed Gomaa/ Associated Press ) – A protester is detained by security forces in front of the Saudi Embassy in Cairo, Egypt during a demonstration to demand the release of an Egyptian human rights lawyer detained in Saudi Arabia for allegedly insulting the kingdom’s monarch, Saturday, April 28, 2012. Saudi Arabia said Saturday that it has closed embassy in Cairo because of protests over a detained Egyptian.

  • (Ahmed Gomaa/ Associated Press ) - A protester is detained by security forces in front of the Saudi Embassy in Cairo, Egypt during a demonstration to demand the release of an Egyptian human rights lawyer detained in Saudi Arabia for allegedly insulting the kingdom’s monarch, Saturday, April 28, 2012. Saudi Arabia said Saturday that it has closed embassy in Cairo because of protests over a detained Egyptian.
  • ( Associated Press ) - FILE - In this Tuesday, April 24, 2012 file photo, Egyptian protesters demonstrate in front of the Saudi Embassy in Cairo, Egypt to demand the release of an Egyptian human rights lawyer detained in Saudi Arabia for allegedly insulting the kingdom’s monarch. Arabic on the banner read, “Egyptians will never be insulted, freedom for Ahmed el-Gezawi.” Saudi Arabia said Saturday, April 28, 2012 that it has closed embassy in Cairo because of protests over a detained Egyptian.
  • (Ahmed Gomaa/ Associated Press ) - An Egyptian Army officer argues with protesters demonstrating in front of the Saudi Embassy in Cairo, Egypt to demand the release of an Egyptian human rights lawyer detained in Saudi Arabia for allegedly insulting the kingdom’s monarch, Saturday, April 28, 2012. Saudi Arabia said Saturday that it has closed embassy in Cairo because of protests over a detained Egyptian.
  • (Ahmed Gomaa/ Associated Press ) - Egyptian security forces stand guard outside the Saudi Embassy in Cairo, Egypt during a demonstration to demand the release of an Egyptian human rights lawyer detained in Saudi Arabia for allegedly insulting the kingdom’s monarch, Saturday, April 28, 2012. Saudi Arabia said Saturday that it has closed embassy in Cairo because of protests over a detained Egyptian. 

By Associated Press, Updated: Saturday, April 28, 3:01 PM

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi Arabia closed its Cairo embassy Saturday and recalled its ambassador following protests over a detained Egyptian human rights lawyer in a sharp escalation of tension between two regional powerhouses already on shaky terms due to uprisings in the Arab world.

The unexpected Saudi diplomatic break came following days of protests by hundreds of Egyptians outside the Saudi Embassy in Cairo and consulates in other cities to demand the release of Ahmed el-Gezawi. Relatives and human rights groups say he was detained for allegedly insulting the kingdom’s monarch.

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About Eeyore

Canadian artist and counter-jihad and freedom of speech activist as well as devout Schrödinger's catholic

3 Replies to “Saudi Arabia closes Cairo embassy, recalls ambassador due to protests over detained Egyptian”

  1. Given the turmoil between shia & sunni factions, perhaps it’s time torecall another, less reported and even less well known event of 1979 – as told by Yaroslav Trofimov, “The Siege of Mecca
    Quoting from the book:

    “On November 20, 1979, worldwide attention was focused on Tehran, where the Iranian hostage crisis was entering its third week. The same morning, hundreds og gunmen stunned the world by seizing Islam’s holiest shrine, the Grand Mosque in Mecca. These men came from more than a dozen countries, launching the first operation of global jihad in modern times. With nearly 100,000 worshippers trapped inside the holy compound, Mecca’s bloody siege lasted two weeks, causing hundreds of deaths.
    Despite US assistance, the Saudi royal famly proved haplessly incapable of dislodgin the occupier. In Iran, Ayatollah Khomeini blamed the Great Satan– the US– for defiling the shrine, prompting mobs to storm and torch American embassies in Pakistan and Libya. The desperate Saudis finally enlisted the help of French commandos, who prepared the final assault and supplied poison gas that knocked out the insurgents.
    This immensely consequential story was barely covered in the press, as Saudi Arabia imposed an information blackout and kept foreign correspondents away.”

    Ignoring instead of encouraging this natural animosity between islamic factions had unfavorable results for the West thus far.

    At JihadWatch.org, Hugh Fitzgerald often wrote about the shia/sunni divide which should be encouraged. From 2006:

    “It is not only that the Light-Unto-the-Muslim Nations project ignored Iraqi reality, ignored the absence of any spirit of compromise or non-violence, in the Muslim world. It is also that the policy was intended to prevent exactly what we should have wished to encourage — Sunni-Shi’a hostility that lasts for a very long time, and that draws in, and uses up the resources, of the circumjacent Muslim states, including Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran, with their governments supplying the money, the materiel, and even volunteers to their respective co-religionists. Apparently one is not supposed to wish for such things. Apparently one is supposed to deplore any divisions in the camp of Islam.

    Imagine if, in 1943, for some reason Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan came to blows. What would have been our reaction? Horror? A desire to avoid such an outcome? Attempts to prevent it?

    The American government has been insufficiently clear on what it should be doing. And the main problem is its failure to identify the “root cause” of Muslim terrorism or the other sources of unsettlement and menace directed at the people, legal and political institutions, art and culture, of the Infidel world. That “root cause” is Islam. . .During the Iran-Iraq War Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the U.A.E. gave Iraq some $60 billion to conduct its war. That would be what today? $120 billion? $180 billion? How much do you think Saudi Arabia would pay to prevent the Shi’a being right next door, next door that is to the seveal hundred thousand Shi’a in Dammam and Dhahran and the rest of the Eastern Province in which the Shi’a of Saudi Arabia live, and which also happens to be the place where the oil is located? Would Saudi Arabia do nothing? Would Sunnis everywhere do nothing?” . . .”The removal of Saddam Hussein inevitably set in motion the transfer of power from Sunnis to Shi’a that cannot be accepted by the former, and will not be surrendered by the latter. This is the War of Unintended Consequences. But what is “unintended” and apparently unrecognized by everyone else, seems perfectly clear to me and did so back in March and April of 2004, and earlier too — that the forces set in motion, and that could not be stopped, would inevitably lead to further division, and demoralization, and a weakening of the camp of Islam. I call that a victory for Infidels.” . . .”Why Americans and other Westerners, and other Infidels, have been led to believe they must hide their evident delight in the weakening of an enemy, is unclear.

  2. “Ignoring instead of encouraging this natural animosity between islamic factions had unfavorable results for the West thus far.”
    ”Why Americans and other Westerners, and other Infidels, have been led to believe they must hide their evident delight in the weakening of an enemy, is unclear. ”

    i cant hide my delight, never could.
    now, with Iraq sinking into the cesspit of islamism, (let it), the two sides have a direct rout to each others throat.
    good.
    we just need to make sure they don’t run out of ammo and keep their battles on their land.

  3. The more chaos over there the better, but don’t expect it to help us much, they will unite to fight us even while killing each other.

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