Turkish Muslims no longer hide Nazi connection

From autotranslate of this page:

More from The Armenian Weekly:

Mouradian: ‘Missing Hitler’s Spirit’: The Problematic Post-Flotilla Discourse in Turkey

On June 5, at a demonstration organized in Istanbul by the Islamic Saadet Party, one of the banners read, in Turkish: “Legendary leader Hitler, our patience is running out, we need your spirit.” The incident was just one of countless anti-Semitic statements, slogans, and banners made during rallies in Turkey after the Israeli attack on the flotilla of ships attempting to break the blockade on Gaza. I spoke to writers and activists from Turkey about the implications of this discourse.

Banner from protest in Turkey: “Legendary leader Adolf Hitler, our patience is running out, we need your spirit.”

“Israel’s lawless and irrational act of violence unleashed an exaggerated display of bravado on the part of the government in Turkey,” said Ayse Gunaysu, a human rights activist from Turkey. Gunaysu’s concerned about the anti-Semitic discourse used by the protesters and the way that Turkish intellectuals have been overlooking its dangerous undertones, even before the attack on the flotilla. She gives the example of a public rally on May 8, during which one speaker said, “From now on all Jews everywhere in the world and even all Jews in Turkey are our targets” (see http://fr.video.yahoo.com/watch/7462019/19667659 ).

“The protesters are not concerned about peace,” Gunaysu explained. “They are calling for more violence and more bloodshed. Because they—particularly Islamic protesters, at times backed by leftists groups as well—are not against a particular Israeli government and its particular policies, but against the existence of Israel itself.”

“It is sickening to hear the government suddenly assume the role of champion of international law, never mind that in 1974, the Turkish armed forces crossed the international waters, invaded a sovereign country [Cyprus], and its occupation continues to date,” she added. “Not to mention the decades-long war in Turkey [against the Kurds], which has caused tens of thousands of deaths, hundreds of disappearances, and the destruction and evacuation of thousands of villages.”

For Gunaysu, the hypocrisy is astounding. “The killing of civilians by the Israeli special forces is outrageous. But it is equally upsetting to know that there is such fury here against what happened to fellow Muslims in another part of the world, while Turkey feels quite alright with its own denial of the genocide of Asia Minor’s Christian population, a legacy on which the Turkish republic was founded.”

Congratulating the Nazis: “Ellerinize Saglik” (Well done!). Photo from the same demonstration. Source: http://www.habervesaire.com/haber/1868/

On May 31, Bilgin Ayata, a scholar from Turkey, was in Taksim Square, where several rallies were held. She recounted what she saw: “The general atmosphere was very tense and full of anger, and some of the slogans targeted Jews, not just the Israeli state. The angry atmosphere takes sustenance from Prime Minister [Recep Tayyip] Erdogan’s fierce comments and attitude that fuels the anger against Israel.”

Ayata also raises the issue of hypocrisy. “There is a strange schizophrenia at place: Erdogan described the attacks of Israel as ‘state terrorism’ and declared that Hamas is not a terrorist organization. It would be nice if he would apply the same standards to his own country. Unfortunately, it seems that the opposite is happening. On June 4, Sevahir Bayindir, a Kurdish MP, was attacked by the police and hurt in Silopi during a protest against the military operations in the Kurdish regions. A day earlier, Firat Basan, a 14-year-old Kurdish boy, was killed when a tank rolled over him during a similar protest in Sirnak. Also on June 4, Irfan Aktar, a Kurdish journalist, received a prison sentence of one year because of an article he wrote on the Kurdish issue in a magazine. Over 1,400 members of the pro-Kurdish party DTP are in prison since 2009—some of them are elected mayors and prominent members of human rights organizations. More than one million Kurds have been displaced in Turkey in the past decade, and they can not go back to their villages because the state does not clear landmines. Paramilitary forces and military operations are leading even to new cases of displacement.”

“I wholeheartedly condemn the violence employed by the Israeli state last week, just as I did when I was actively working in the region and writing about the Palestinian issue,” said Talin Suciyan, a journalist from Turkey. “But the social and political atmosphere created in Turkey has other dimensions. On the one hand, there are journalists, artists, and public opinion leaders talking about ‘banging up Israel’ with literature and arts, while there are others who carry posters asking Hitler to send them his spirit. And frequently, ‘Tekbir’ (chanting ‘Allahu ekber’) accompanies these. In the past, such reactions have invariably led to hostile attitudes against citizens of Turkey—in this case the Turkish Jews. One always has to keep in mind that the republican and also pre-republican history is full of such attacks against Armenians, Greeks, and Jews, incited in the aftermath of international events.”

“If this is an issue of condemning state violence,” she continued, “I have to say I have not, to this day, encountered such decisive attitude, when it comes to issues concerning the people of Turkey itself.”

Ayata agrees. “If PM Erdogan really has a problem with state terrorism, he should stop it in his own country.”

About Eeyore

Canadian artist and counter-jihad and freedom of speech activist as well as devout Schrödinger's catholic
This entry was posted in anti semitism, Geopolitics, Islam, Islam and Nazis, Islam in Europe, thuggery and intimidation, Turkey, war on jews. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Turkish Muslims no longer hide Nazi connection

  1. RRWest says:

    How much more proof does the free world need that Islam is a large group of fascist regimes, whose aim is world conquest?

    Do the Musim nations have to physically invade other countries before the free world does something?

    No, wait, let me re-phrase that. Do the Muslim countries have to use soldiers, not immigrants, to invade Israel and the west as the Muslim emperors did centuries ago before we see how dangerous Islam is to the world?

    The leaders of Islam are not that stupid.

    They have planted their fifth column troops all over the world. We call them “immigrants” or “refugees”. Millions of them are not that at all, but jihadists, waiting until Islam’s power is sufficient enough within the west to disrupt any attempts by the western world to stop them from wiping Israel off the map and moving into southern Europe.

    Time for the west to truly see the enemy that is Islam.

    We have too much to lose if we don’t.

  2. chris jones says:

    A few weeks back, as most of you probably know, on Facebook, they had a thing called Everybody Draw Mohammed Day. Well, that was an opportunity to argue with and read letters from countless thousands of furious Muslims, and a good place to make some observations. For one thing, Muslims seem to think an argument is just a fight. It never occurs to them that a good point might be made or that a mind might be changed. ‘If you critisize me then you are my enemy and we are at war, period!’ So the whole Age Of Reason thing just never got to them. Another thing that stood out was their overwhelming and unanimous hatred of Jews. I think it’s a pretty safe statement to say that all Muslims hate Jews. I mean, come on, Allah and Mohammed both despise Jews. Also I noticed a great many positive references to Naziism and Adolph Hitler. I would say the average Muslim is an admirer of Adolph Hitler. This is hilarious, isn’t it? These Hitler admirers have openly declared their desire to destroy us, and our leaders just won’t mention it. You can’t get more blatant than this, even if they dressed up in devil outfits. And yet, our government continues to import Muslims by the tens of thousands. Nothing to see here…move along.

  3. Eeyore says:

    Its not widely known why the nation of Persia changed its name to Iran. But it should be. If you don’t know, check yourselves as to what date and why they did that. It came as such a shock to me, that I would rather you all checked it for yourselves than learned this from me.

    This just to augment the excellent comment by Chris

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